How to be smart

In a time where we’re constantly bombarded with messages, it can feel impossible to guard against bias while making fast and prudent decisions.   

The perils of Confirmation Bias are well known; when we think we know something our minds ignore or place less value on information that runs contrary to what we think we know.

If you don’t think you’re affected by Confirmation Bias, think again (and read this book). In a time where we’re constantly bombarded with messages, it can feel impossible to guard against bias while making fast and prudent decisions.   

One way to guard against biased decisions is to involve others. Ask colleagues to weigh in or play the role of Black Hat to spot potential problems. Another is to have a standing set of questions that challenge decisions such as “What would my toughest customer say about this decision?” or “How would I feel if this decision were broadcast on TV tonight?” And if you have to make a decision quickly without these options, be sure to reflect at a later time on whether or not the decision was the best one. If you were biased in a decision that was made, can you learn to avoid it next time?  

Consider

What strategies can you use to avoid bias? Can you identify a recent decision that might have been biased? 

Related content